Featured image of post Archaeological sites once thought lost under Lake Powell reappear

Archaeological sites once thought lost under Lake Powell reappear

When Lake Powell on the Colorado River first began to fill in the 1960s, it flooded archaeological sites and places with cultural and spiritual significance to Indigenous peoples. Now some of those sites have reemerged as drought shrinks the reservoir. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the future of the area is unclear.

· 1201 points

When Lake Powell on the Colorado River first began to fill in the 1960s, it flooded archaeological sites and places with cultural and spiritual significance to Indigenous peoples. Now some of those sites have reemerged as drought shrinks the reservoir. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the future of the area is unclear.

Highlights

  • Archaeologists removed what they could before Glen Canyon disappeared beneath Lake Powell.
  • At least a quarter of the sites documented in the Glen Canyon Project still exist and are on dry land again.
  • Archaeologists are concerned that exposed sites may be in danger of further impacts.
  • The National Park Service is monitoring the newly emerged sites.
  • The future of the area is unclear; Navajo Nation anthropologist wants more public education about the cultural heritage of the region.
  • The Navajo Nation says the work should be in partnership with the Navajo Nation, not the Park Service, to save the area’s cultural heritage.